Feel free to leave a comment on anything you see on my web site.

Russ Stutler's Message Board





Comments:
He Russell,
Like your articals a lot. Living in tanzania i miss the dutch tradition of singing the genevan psalms introduced by John Calvin. In your article i missed this form of singing the psalms. I find it so beautifull knowing that my grandmother any many generations before her have sang those psalms. Just like we do now. Accompanied with a big pipeorgan its a joy to listen and praise God.

Gelske

Admin reply: Thank you for your message! I imagine the culture in Tanzania is very different from the Psalm singing and pipe organ culture of Europe!


Added: November 7, 2014
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Comments:
Your website is an inspiring gift.

Admin reply: Thank you!


Added: October 26, 2014
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Comments:

Private post. Click to view.



Added: September 26, 2014
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Comments:
Russell
Thank you for your great wealth of sketches. I learn a lot from your work. I study your style and try it. I mostly paint watercolor plein air. I am a pastor in San Diego. Thank you for your testimony about your faith in Christ. I would like to visit you some day.
Luis

Admin reply: Hello Pastor Luis, Thanks for the kind words. I think San Diego is an excellent place to sketch. I have some family in that area. May God bless you!


Added: September 19, 2014
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Comments:
Russ, We were, in 1895, the first monastery founded by St. John's, Collegeville. They also opened a priory in Tokyo, Trinity Benedictine Monastery. It was moved, relatively recently, to Fujimi and the monastery was awarded major prizes for it's architecture. It looks to be about 30 miles N; NW of Tokyo.
You could celebrate the St. Benedict blessing there..... Aelred

Admin reply: I had heard there was something out there in Japan. It sounds definitely worth a visit if I can find a train going out in that direction. Thanks!


Added: August 31, 2014
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Comments:
Wonderful site, Russ! I use your helpful articles on music for the liturgy of the hours when i help present a weekend confernce on the hours for the Archdiocese of Settle. I am choirmaster of our Benedictine Abbey, St. Martin's. I'll refrence your whole website as "required reading" when I next meet with the conference participants in mid-September.
(Br.) Aelred Woodard OSB

Admin reply: Wow, that's great to hear! I don't get to communicate Benedictines in Tokyo -- and I've really tried find one in the past when I needed to find a priest to consent to "properly" bless my St. Benedict medals! So this is a great honor to finally hear from one. Thank you!


Added: August 30, 2014
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Comments:
You may enjoy the following, recalled when reading "A Strange Wind Blowing":

I work as a Federal contractor in schools on a reservation and we often have strong, strong winds on the high desert and next to mountains. My young students walk between buildings with me during the day.

Occasionally, as we are blown along or into or sideways, I ask a child if he/she would like to have a string tied to a button and go sailing off. To see things. To try flying. Just to do it.

Some children may briefly consider the idea while most others tend to shrink back and hurry on.

One little boy's face lit up and with a faraway look in his eyes when I asked him the first time and he was ready to go. And he always is.

This is the student I talk to about the world.

I want to thank you for the enjoyable hours I have spent on your site. And now my return to sumi-e painting as well as the soon-to-be owner of a yatate.

Admin reply: Thank you for the great story! I myself often had dreams of flying because of the wind when I was a kid.


Added: July 2, 2014
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Comments:
Hi Russ, thanks for putting together such an extensive book list. Is it in any particular order?

I'm new to sketching and I'll be using mechanical pencils, draft pencils and lead holders. What brand, type, size, and such sketchbooks would you recommend? I have a Winsor & Newton Visual Diary 11' x 14' 110gsm acid free, left from school. The paper's not exactly smooth, but can I still use it for sketching/drawing?

Admin reply: The book list is not in any particular order, except perhaps the order in which I discovered those books.

As for paper, I haven't used the paper you mentioned, but if you are using pencil alone, then it is simply a matter of what you personally prefer, and what fits your drawing style. Almost any paper works well with pencil, and you can get away with something inexpensive.

It's fun to experiment, but I'd do a web search or asking the folks at the local art supply shop so you don't blow too much money on the way.

Good luck.


Added: June 25, 2014
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Comments:
Hi Russ , thanks for your well put together page about psalms and psalm singing. Your enthusiasm is infectious and you obviously have a love for the psalms. Have you come across the efforts of Christ Church, Moscow, ID, USA in putting together a psalter? It is a work in progress, I suppose. The psalms are not metrical but are what can be described as 'through composed' and are suitable for congregational singing. I hasten to add I have nothing to do with them whatsoever but speaking as an enthusiast they are certainly among the best psalms i have ever heard and thought you might be interested to know about them. Sort of between metrical and plainsong, for me, they hit the sweet spot and are exemplary in their whole approach to psalms.

Admin reply: I hadn't heard of their work with the Psalms, but when anyone from Scotland says nice things about another Psalter, I stand up and take notice. :)

I'll do a web search then.


Added: June 23, 2014
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Comments:
Hi Russ. I've recently bought an early version of a Pilot Capless pen (Vanishing Point). What kind of cartridges/converter does it use? Having trouble finding something that works. Any suggestions where I can buy a converter/cartridges for it? Thank you in advance.

Admin reply: Check the date stamp on the nib. If it was made since the 1970s then it takes a regular cartridge which is available today. If it was made in the 1960s, it takes "double spare" cartridges or a special double spare converter. Check with the person who sold it to you; they really shouldn't sell a pen without providing a means to use it.


Added: June 10, 2014
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